GW Seeks to Learn from Freeh Report/Penn State

Following the widespread concerns around the Jerry Sandusky case at Penn State, the university spent $6.5 million and commissioned an independent report on pretty much everything surrounding the case. The Freeh Report was released to the public in July, and provided 120 recommendations in these areas: culture, administration and general counsel, compliance, board of trustees, athletic department, university police department, programs for non-student minors and access to facilities, and monitoring change and measuring improvement.

Within Higher Education, those recommendations do not need to apply solely to Penn State, a self-analysis through the lens of the Freeh Report would likely help any institution do a better job in serving its students, staff and guests. The Fairfax (VA) News reports that The George Washington University is doing just that. “GW President Steven Knapp convened a task force to examine the university’s policies, guidelines, practices and procedures in light of the report’s findings and recommendations. The task force is looking at a variety of compliance and operational issues to ensure that the university not only has sound policies in place but that they are documented and enforced.” The article also mentions that GW did a similar process following the release of the report from Virginia Tech following their tragedy in 2007.

I applaud the leadership shown by GW and President Knapp. This approach sets a good example for all of higher education. (Click here for the GW press release.)

On the other hand, the new “Max Headroom-inspired” logo for GW leaves a lot to be desired.

Advertisements

About deanharwood

Interested in talking about current events in the fraternity/sorority world.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s